The Trail

Roll over the map to explore the various sites along the trail and find out more about them...
St. Brecans
First Derry Presbyterian Church
St. Augustine’s Church
Lower Tower Church
Carlisle Road Methodist Church
The Peace Bridge / Guildhall Square
St Columb’s Well
St Columb’s Cathedral

St. Brecans

St Brecan’s is the only surviving medieval church in Derry˜ Londonderry. The present ruins are 16th century but the site was in use from at least the 12th century and probably for a lot longer. Little is known about St. Brecan except that he is said to have founded his church here at Cluain Í, a name which survives in the form Clooney. Proceed across the Peace Bridge to the walled city.

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Long Tower
Church

In the 12th century the Abbot of Derry became head of the Churches of St Columba in Ireland. He built the great Teampall Mór (Templemore) with its round tower in this vicinity. The Long Tower Church was built on this site in the 1780s, and greatly enlarged in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The St Columba’s Heritage Centre opens here in 2013.

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First Derry
Presbyterian Church

There has been a Presbyterian church here since 1690 when Presbyterians received a grant from Queen Mary in recognition of their part in defending the city during the siege of 1689. The present building dates from 1780 and was re-opened in 2011 following a major restoration. To follow the trail, proceed up Magazine Street to St Augustine’s.

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Carlisle Road
Methodist Church

Methodism came to Derry˜ Londonderry in the late 18th century, and the founder of Methodism, John Wesley visited the city on four occasions. The first Methodist meeting house was on Magazine Street and there were two others within the city walls. The present church opened in 1903.

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St. Augustine’s
Church

Modern scholarship suggests that this is the site of the 6th century monastery of Derry. The early monastery had close links with Iona. In the 13th century the monks became part of the order of St Augustine, giving the church its modern name. The present church was built in 1872, and the church is a parish of the Church of Ireland Diocese of Derry and Raphoe.

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